How to Save Your Teeth

Bleeding gums, tender gums, discoloured teeth, mouth ulcers and bad breath are all signs of food intolerances. If you have bad teeth, chances are you’re eating foods that don’t agree with you, it’s not just “bad genetics”. This is fixable but do it ASAP because enamel damage doesn’t heal – the gum problems heal.

Dad as an example: Dad had gum disease and receding gums. He used a water pick to help but his teeth weren’t in good shape. He has zero gum issues now. No tenderness, no more recession, and no gum disease. He’s shocked. This is one of the things he mentions most to me that surprises him. Even if he travels and doesn’t bring his water pick, there’s no bleeding when he comes home.

Me as an example: My gums used to bleed when I brushed my teeth. I also had discoloured teeth. When I have a reaction to something I’ve eaten, my gums bleed again. As soon as the reaction is over my gums stop bleeding. My plaque levels have gone down shockingly. I don’t have plaque anymore, my dentist has commented on it. I used to have terrible plaque build up and always got hell for not flossing – what they thought the cause of my gums bleeding was.

The diet should help your mouth situation. Gum disease isn’t a good idea, and bleeding gums are not a good sign. You don’t want to end up without teeth as an old dude/dudette right?

Last thing I want to mention:

If you have weirdly discoloured teeth, you should do a genetic test for the Celiac gene. 23andme includes the gene on their test. One of the signs of Celiac are teeth that look like this (a quick google search of “Celiac teeth” will bring up more examples):

My grandfathers on both sides lost all or a good portion of their teeth by the time they were middle-aged. Turns out they both have the Celiac gene. My teeth had dental enamel wear early on that was definitely from food. Celiac gene or not, diet can mess up your teeth terribly – as shows by Dad. Ditching gluten should help (and ditching everything else that isn’t good should definitely help).

Posted in FAQ

5 thoughts on “How to Save Your Teeth

  1. Couple of questions, kid, not related to teeth per se, but to the diet itself:
    1. What about fresh oysters and clams – we live near the ocean and this is a favorite activity. Can we dig ’em?
    2. What about Bok Choy? I’m assuming it’s ok because it’s a green.
    3. I want to make a one-time contribution to your excellent and effective effort but can’t do that through Patreon. Do you have a PayPal account, or should I just send you a check?

    On a final note, I didn’t think there would be another human being in the world who would change my life more than you dad did – but you’re coming mighty close.

    Keep upping the unbelievable health/wealth/wise standards up!


  2. Noyan Mughal says:

    What should you do if you’re not digesting fats and have floating stools?

    I’m 18 and have a lot of digestive issues which I think are related to fat malabsorption. I have very dry skin and lips. I’m taking coconut oil right.

    • It depends how long it’s been since you’ve changed your diet. I had what looked like undigested fats in my stool for a couple of weeks when I switched to zero-carb. It’s been completely resolved. I’ve actually found that eating leaner cuts give me more digestive issues than fattier cuts. Sometimes you need time.

  3. One of the best books I’ve read to understand dental health is “Nutrition and Physical Degeneration” by Weston A Price. You don’t even have to read it, just look at the photos he took in the 1930’s of people from all over the world eating there traditional diets, compared to people in the same area who switched to a modern diet of flour and sugar.

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